The following words are drawn from passage one of the diagnostic AP Exam we experienced the first week of class.
Each entry contains the following seven parts: Word, pronunciation (sound link or phonetic spelling), full definition(s) + samples, sentence from passage, image and memory tip.
List of words/definitions:

Amiable- Having or showing pleasant, good-natured personal qualities

Domineering- inclined to rule arbitrarily or despotically; overbearing; tyrannical: domineering parents.

Christened- to receive into the Christian church by baptism; baptize.

Circumlocution- a roundabout or indirect way of speaking; the use of more words than necessary to express an idea.

Contemporaries- a person belonging to the same time or period with another or others.

Cynical- bitterly or sneeringly distrustful, contemptuous, or pessimistic.

Enterprising- ready to undertake projects of importance or difficulty, or untried schemes; energetic in carrying out any undertaking

Gallantry- bravery, heroic behavior

Idyll - a simple narrative, poem, piece of literature, or depition of the admiration of nature and simplicity of something

Idyllic- suitable for or suggestive of an idyll; charmingly simple or rustic.

Inequitable- not equitable; unjust or unfair: an inequitable decision.

Imprudence- not prudent; lacking discretion; incautious; rash.

Impudence- The quality of being offensively bold.

Jacobean- Having to do with James I of England.

Melancholy- a pensive mood

Mirth- gaiety or jollity, especially when accompanied by laughter.

Philanthropy- goodwill to fellowmen; especially active effort to promote human welfare

Rector- head of a college, religious house, or congregation

Repudiation- the act of repudiating, the state of being repudiated; (to refuse to have anything to do with, to refuse to accept, to reject as unauthorized or as having no binding force)

Sullen- dull or somber in sound or color; dismal or gloomy



A-F

AMIABLE
-defintion:1. Having or showing pleasant, good-natured personal qualities; affable: an amiable disposition. 2. Friendly; sociable: an amiable greeting; an amiable gathering. 3.
Agreeable; willing to accept the wishes, decisions, or suggestions of another or others. 4. Obsolete. Lovable or lovely.
-pronounciation: a·mi·a·ble
-sample sentence:Our waitress was very amiable so my mom left her a big tip.
-original sentence: The rector of Hambleden at the time has left letters in which are glimpses of an amiable, charictable and democratic pair.
image:amiable.gif
memory tip: My friend Amy is amiable!



DOMINEERING
-definition:inclined to rule arbitrarily or despotically; overbearing; tyrannical: domineering parents.
-pronunciation:dom·i·neer·ing
-sample sentence: The bully was domineering during lunchtime.
-original sentence: He was brought up at home among his sisters, and he grew up as such boys do, spoilt, domineering, and headstrong.
image:external image bully.jpg
memory tip: think of dominating when you see domineering.



CHRISTENED
-definition: 1. to receive into the Christian church by baptism; baptize; 2. to give a name to at baptism; 3. to name and dedicate: to christen a ship; 4. to make use of for the
first time.
-pronunciation: chris-end
-sample sentence: The priest christened three babies today.
-original sentence: At the Manor on October 16th, 1797, their second child and only male infant was born and christened James Thomas.
-image: external image christened_sweden.jpg
-memory tip: We christened our son Christian.



CIRCUMLOCUTION
-definition: a roundabout or indirect way of speaking; the use of more words than necessary to express an idea.
-pronunciation: sir-come-low-q-shun
-sample sentence: (scissors) =those things that is used to cut other things.
-original sentence: (found in question 11) a circumlocution for "appearing ridiculous."
-image:external image around-circumlocution.gif
-memory tip: circum=circle around. Going around in a circle before arriving at the location.



CONTEMPORARIES
-definition: a person belonging to the same time or period with another or others.
-pronunciation: con-temp-er-aries
-sample sentence: I consider my good friends to be my contemporaries.
-original sentence: He retained however, from those early years a liking for the society of women, and a softness in his manner towards them, which having regards to his manner with men, struck his contemporaries with surprise.
-image: external image baby-boomer2.jpg-
-memory tip: When you think of the word contemporary, you often think of the adjective ‘modern,’ since they are synonyms. Objects that are modern are all from the same time period, just as contemporaries are people belong to the same time period as someone else.



CYNICAL
-definition:bitterly or sneeringly distrustful, contemptuous, or pessimistic.
-pronounciation:cyn·i·cal
-sample sentence: My brother is a cynical person; he is always looking at the negative side of things.
-original sentence: (question number 3) so familiar with the realm described as to be somewhat cynical
-image:external image jmo1284l.jpg
-memory tip: Cynic is a negative person




ENTERPRISING
-definition: ready to undertake projects of importance or difficulty, or untried schemes; energetic in carrying out any undertaking
-pronunciation: en·ter·prize·ing
-sample sentence: Businesses are in need of enterprising young people.
-original sentence: (question number 4)
-image: enterprising_man.jpg
-memory tip: When you hear the word "enterprising," associate it with energetic, and someone entering a new project or job.



G-M




GALLANTRY
-definition: bravery, heroic behavior
-pronunciation: gal-un-tree
-sample sentence:The solider trotted through the dessert in a gallantry manner.
-original sentence: But the boy had a dash and gallantry that were irresistible.
image:external image Dale%20Gallon%20-%20For%20Distinguished%20Gallantry.jpg
memory tip: The word gallantry is a form of the word 'gallant.' Gallant is often used in fairytales to describe a "gallant knight," and means chivalrous or dashing. Therefore if you think of gallant, you will think of the knight being brave, and then remember that bravery is synonymous with gallantry.



IDYLL
-definition: a simple narrative, poem, piece of literature, or depition of the admiration of nature and simplicity of something
-pronunciation: idol
-sample sentence: The first snowfall provides splendid ideas to create an idyll.
-original sentence:
-image:external image korovin-idyll.jpg external image river_peaceful.jpg
-memory tip: Idyll sounds like idol, which means something that is admired or adored. Since an idyll depicts the admiration of something, then you can remember what it means by thinking of the word idol.



IDYLLIC
-definition: suitable for or suggestive of an idyll; charmingly simple or rustic.
-pronunciation: i-dill-ick
-sample sentence: He lived an idyllic life in Tahiti.
-original sentence: (question number 1) characterize an idyllic era
-image: idyllic.jpg
-memory tip: Living in an idyllic setting is really living in an ideal setting. Ideal and idyllic sound very alike. Just remember the ideal pleasantness and simplicity.



INEQUITABLE
-defintion: not equitable; unjust or unfair: an inequitable decision.
-pronounciation: in·eq·ui·ta·ble
-sample sentence: The athletes all found the call to be inequitable and they protested.
-original sentence:
-image:inequitable.jpg
-memory tip: equitable looks like equal so think of, NOT equal judgment.



IMPRUDENCE
-definition:not prudent; lacking discretion; incautious; rash.
-pronounciation:im·pru·dent
-sample sentence: The decision was made quickly with imprudence.
-original sentence: It was not a union which seemed likely to prosper, since its chief characteristics were imprudence, youth, and extremely good looks.
-image:imprudence.gif
-memory tip: Think of intrude when you see imprudence: the decision intruded into your head before you had time to think it through.



IMPUDENCE
-definition: The quality of being offensively bold.
-pronunciation: im·pu·dence
-sample sentence: Jerry was very impudent in our discussion when he said that dogs were ugly.
-original sentence:
-image:external image cgo0229l.jpg
-memory tip: Think of P.U as in "stinky;" people's mean words can be stinky (impudence) and hurt.



JACOBEAN
-definition: Having to do with James I of England.
-pronunciation: jack-o-be-an
-sample sentence: They were Jacobean writers.
-original sentence: They chose to live quietly in the country at the Manor, a Jacobean house set on gently rising grounds and framed in chestnut trees.
-image:410px-James_I_of_England_by_Daniel_Mytens_in_1621.jpg
-memory tip: Think of James I and then think Jacobean.




MELANCHOLY
-definition: 1: an abnormal state attributed to and characterized by irascibility or depression; 2 a : depression of spirits; a pensive mood
-pronunciation: melon-colly
-sample sentence: The news of her fathers death was so traumatic that she was left in a melancholy state for a month.
-original sentence: The melancholy truth was that his glorious golden head had nothing in it.
-image: external image depressed-862.png
-memory tip: If you haven’t learned the definition after three years of having it as a vocabulary word, then that’s just depressing. Which would mean you would be melancholy



MIRTH
-definition: gaiety or jollity, especially when accompanied by laughter.
-pronunciation: spoken as seen
-sample sentence: He was unable to conceal his mirth.
-original sentence: ....Lord Cardigan, ad an almost medieval deference, a chivalrous turn of phrase, a sometimes embarrassing readiness to protect and defend, which, though productive of astonishment and mirth, were nevertheless rooted in a genuine sympathy.
-image: external image laughing-babies.jpg?version=1303759447000
-memory tip : Mirth rhymes with birth, and when a baby is born, mirth, joy, and happiness is brought to the parents.


N-S




PHILANTHROPY
-definition : goodwill to fellowmen; active effort to promote human welfare
-pronunciation: fil-anthro-p
-sample sentence: The sorority holds donations for their Children's Hospital philanthropy.
-sample sentence: (question number 5) provide evidence of the Brudenell's philanthropy
-image: external image 6a011571801c18970b014e895ba23e970d-800wi
-memory tip: Philanthropy, starts with fill (phil), so think about filling a donation box.



RECTOR
-definition: head of a college, religious house, or congregation
-pronunciation: rec-tor

-original sentence: "She is a sweet woman, possessing a temper both mild and engaging," wrote the rector.
-image: external image pope-II1.jpg
-memory tip: The word 'rectory' is more commonly heard, and is defined as the place that a church provides for the church's head to live. You can remember this because the person who lives at the 'rectory' is the 'rector.'




REPUDIATION
-definition: to refuse to have anything to do with, to refuse to accept, to reject as unauthorized or as having no binding force
-pronunciation: rep-u-de-a-tion
-sample sentence: My teacher repudiated my excuse for my missing homework.
-original sentence: ... repudation of Greville's accusation (question 14).
-image: external image refusal-english-thumb7554688.jpg
-memory tip: You’ll usually hear repudiate, so just think about how the last syllable sounds like eight. Then think about the 8 ball in pool, and how you want to stay away from it (pretend you don’t hit the 8 ball in at the end of the game and that you just don’t want to touch it at all)




SULLEN
-definition: dull or somber in sound or color; dismal or gloomy
-pronunciation: sull-en
-sample sentence: Her painting reflected the sullen mood she was feeling.
-original sentence:
-image:

sullen.JPG









-memory Tip: You can think of sulk which means feeling sad for oneself; both refer to feeling gloomy



T-Z

There are no T-Z words from passage one.