Vocabulary Work:
The following words are drawn from Wayne C. Booth's chapter: "The Threats of Political Rhetrickery. "
For your assigned word, create and post (in alphabetical order) an entry including the following parts: Word, Pronunciation (sound linor phonetic spelling), Complete definition(s) provided in Dictionary. com, Sentence from the chapter, an Image that can be with the word, and a memory tip.
Rhetrickery Vocab. Assignments
Casuistry - Alex
Ambiguous - Michael
Emanate - Brendan
Lament - Alexandra
Abominable - Sachi
Ostensibly - Krystle
Rhetor - Jasmine
Manifold - Adam
Preemptive - Brandis
Rhetoricians - Danielle
Conciliation - Isabel
Inflame - Marie
Contemptible - Erin
Indictment – Natalie Bartels
Grotesque – Adam Bruno
Phronesis – Brooke Smith
Banality- Kylie Thompson
Vitriolic- Rachel Weaver
POST VOCAB WORK HERE:

ABOMINABLE
Pronunciation: [uh-bom-uh-nuh-buhl]
Definitions:
1. repugnantly hateful; detestable; loathsome
2. very unpleasant; disagreeable
3. very bad, poor, or inferior
Sentence from Article: Feeling threatened by those problems, I wonder how many readers here have been as obsessed as I have been, through many decades with abominable P-Rhet. (p. 108)
snowman.jpg
Memory Tip: Think of the abominable snowman, if you hate winter, every snowman is abominable.
-Sachi Nagase


Conciliation- noun
[kuhn-sill-ee-ay-shun]

Definition: a method of helping the parties in a dispute to reach agreement, esp divorcing or separating couples to part amicably

(pg. 108)
"What proportion of the population in England, the year before that, had actually read, or could have read if they tried, Burke’s speech recommending conciliation with the Colonies?”

conciliation_256.png

Memory Tip: The word “conciliation” starts with the prefix “con” which means together or joint. When you go through the process of conciliation with another party, you are coming together and putting aside your differences.

-Isabel Park



Simon.jpg
Contemptible – adjective. [kuhn-temp-tuh-buhl]
Page 116.”Opponents of even the noblest cause can too often find examples of retrickery defending that cause, thus ‘proving’ that the ‘enemy’ is contemptible.”
Dictionary.com: deserving or being held in contempt; despicable.
Simon Cowell’s classic face while judging American Idol is contemptible.

-Erin Vivirito

Lament - [luh-ment]
Definitions - to feel or express sorrow or regret for: to lament his absence.; to mourn for or over.;
an expression of grief or sorrow.; a formal expression of sorrow or mourning, especially in verse or song; an elegy or dirge.
Example Sentence from Reading - "As I expand that lament here, the center will be the rhetoric of our leaders, with only a short section toward the end about the rhetoric of protesters." (p 109).
Memory Tip - "Now listen to my sad lament, this is no foolish joke. When I go off on pleasure bent, I always come back broke.
lamentation.jpg -Alexandra Walch

Allusion Work-
allusion (a-LOO-zhuhn): a reference in a literary work to a person, place,
or thing in history or another work of literature. Allusions are often indirect
or brief references to well-known characters or events.
For your assigned allusion, create and post an entry including the following: Identification of the allusion (i.e.- "Drink the Koolaid"), The exact word for word reference as used in Booth's chapter, and an appropriate image related to the allusion. You can copy and paste information from the Booth article and the source you used to research the allusion.

Rhetrickery Allusions Assignments
Aristotle’s “deliberative rhetoric” (p. 107) – Kayla Cummings
Churchill’s “blood, sweat, and tears” speech (p 108) – Nathan Dotson
Edmund Burke (p 110) – Tessa Eckley
Howard Stern (p. 116) –Francis Favis
Rush Limbaugh (p. 117) – Joelle Friesen
Machiavelli – (p. 120) - Grant Guttschow
Jesuits (p 120) – John Ryan Hamilton
T.S. Eliot (p 120) – Gajaba Narraddage
Isaiah Berlin (p 120) – Chris Nardone
Umberto Eco (p 121) – Caroline Ray
For your assigned allusion, create and post an entry including the following: Identification of the allusion (i.e.- "Drink the Koolaid"), The exact word for word reference as used in Booth's chapter , an explanation of the reference. You can copy and paste information from the Booth article and the source you used to research the allusion.
POST ALLUSION WORK HERE
Orwellian doublespeak
  • From Booth: "And at every moment the media were profitting from the daily explosion of vitriolic extremes on all sides and Orwellian doublespeak by this or that moderate.
  • Explanation:(From Wikipedia)
  • Doublespeak: is language that deliberately disguises, distorts, or reverses the [[/wiki/Meaning_(linguistics)|meaning]] of words. Doublespeak may take the form of [[/wiki/Euphemism|euphemisms]] (e.g., "[[/wiki/Downsizing|downsizing]]" for [[/wiki/Layoff|layoffs]], "servicing the target" for bombing [1[[home#cite_note-ReferenceA-0|]]]), making the truth less unpleasant, without denying its nature. It may also be deployed as intentional [[/wiki/Ambiguity|ambiguity]], or reversal of meaning (for example, naming a state of war "peace"). In such cases, doublespeak disguises the nature of the truth, producing a [[/wiki/Communication_in_small_groups#Language_difficulties|communication bypass]].[2[[home#cite_note-Orwell_2008-1|]]][3[[home#cite_note-2|]]] Doublespeak's origins are fuzzy because there is no explicit mention on where its primary concepts came from. However, doublespeak might possibly have certain concepts taken from [[/wiki/George_Orwell|George Orwell]]'s book, [[/wiki/Nineteen_Eighty-Four|Nineteen Eighty-Four]]. Although there is no mention of Doublespeak in Nineteen Eighty-Four, it has been argued that the term is a combination of two concepts - [[/wiki/Doublethink|Doublethink]] and [[/wiki/Newspeak|Newspeak]] which are original to his work